The UK travel industry is facing an uncertain future as a result of Brexit, the Irish Government has warned.

The UK is set to leave the EU’s single market and customs union but is still a member of the customs union, which covers the whole of the UK, and of the European Economic Area (EEA), which covers all the member states.

Under Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty, the UK must leave the single market by March 2019, while EU citizens who have already left the UK can apply for British citizenship if they wish.

The Irish Government is keen to get the process underway as quickly as possible, saying there is a high level of uncertainty around the timing of the process.

The EU will have until the end of the year to formally negotiate the transition arrangements and Irish citizens and businesses must start applying for citizenship before March 2019.

The process is likely to take months to complete.

In the meantime, many businesses have taken matters into their own hands and taken out loans to finance the process, said John McGowan, the head of the Irish Travel Association.

“The Irish Government needs to ensure that all Irish citizens in the UK have access to the Irish passport and the Irish passports will not be required to be renewed,” he said.

The Government said it would be taking a “cautious approach” in relation to the passport requirement, but added that the Irish government would be monitoring the situation closely and that it would make sure that businesses were able to do business. “

It is very important that people understand that we do not need a passport to be able to travel, but we do need a travel document.”

The Government said it would be taking a “cautious approach” in relation to the passport requirement, but added that the Irish government would be monitoring the situation closely and that it would make sure that businesses were able to do business.

The move will be welcomed by Irish businesses who are hoping that the passport rule will make it easier for them to get around the country, with many saying they would be more likely to do so if they had the passport.

A survey carried out by the Irish Traveller and Tourism Alliance (ITTA) earlier this year found that 90 per cent of those who said they would consider travelling to the UK said they had a passport.